REtina surgery- vitrectomy

 At the end of the surgery, the doctor may inject an oil or gas bubble into the eye. This lightly presses the retina against the wall of the eye.

 

If an oil bubble is used, the doctor will need to remove the oil after your eye has healed. 

 

Retina surgery typically lasts 1 to 2 hours. Your surgeon will decide if you will be under local or general anesthesia. 

The retina is a thin layer of tissue that lines the back of the eye on the inside. The purpose of the retina is to receive light that the lens has focused, convert the light into neural signals, and send these signals on to the brain for visual recognition. 

During retina surgery/ vitrectomy, the vitreous gel is removed from your eye so the surgeon can have better access to the back of the eye.  

Retina Surgery/ Vitrectomy is done (along with other treatments) to:  

  • Repair or prevent retinal detachment.  

  • Repair large tears in the retina.  

  • Reduce bleeding in the vitreous gel (vitreous hemorrhage), if bleeding is severe or the blood does not clear on its own.  

  • Treat severe proliferative retinopathy in which scar tissue forms; or new blood vessels grow on the retina and leak blood into the eye.